Valérie’s revanche: Le coup de grâce?

by fpman

It’s all over the papers.

An article in the Daily Mail calls it – really the best expression there is for it – “public figures washing their dirty linen in public.” Imagine that literally is what they are doing, and it won’t be far from what is actually happening.

Valérie Trierweiler, former lover and subsequently partner of current French President François Hollande has written a book, ironically with the title of Merci pour ce moment, printed and prepared for publication in grand secrecy in Germany, revealing to the public all sorts of details about the private life she had with the currently highly unpopular head of state.

TrierweilerMagazine cover heralding the coming of the book

Valérie Trierweiler, often referred to in French public discourse as the “Rottweiler,” or, related to some of her Twitter-based combat of the past, “Tweetweiler,” pulls no punches in presenting an account of all the psychological blows she suffered while First Lady of the Élysée Palace.

The former journalist who hails from a humble family, having been the fifth of six children, in a family where the father, a clerk, lost a leg during World War II, goes after François Hollande with considerable determination – in what some in defence of the President refer to as “paparazzi politics.”

Twice, she says now, François Hollande swore to her, during the course of 2013, that rumors about his relationship with French actress Julie Gayet were false. When word of the affair reappeared, this time among the major news headlines, in January this year, it made her reach for a handful of sleeping pills. In her retelling, Hollande tried to stop her but did not quite manage. She was hospitalized. Hollande immediately dumped her once she was discharged, presumably fearing damage to his popularity from the incident, but kept texting her for a while telling her he needed her. A weird ending to a relationship that in Valérie Trierweiler’s account saw the two gradually alienate from each other after Hollande had taken his office in 2012. At one point, the current Minister of Agriculture, a close advisor and friend of President Hollande, Stéphane Le Foll even told her, in no uncertain fashion:

“If you want an evening with Francois, you have to go through me.”

The book may be clearly in breach of, say, the standards of ethnographic research, in revealing as much as it does, without the consent of those involved. And this raises the extremely complex issue of whether public figures may be entitled to some privacy, too.

But opponents will use this to further Hollande’s character assassination, no matter what. As a member of Hollande’s opposition already declared:

“Clearly, in this case, beyond his private life this is about the temperament of a man whose cynicism and whose indifference are worrying.”

With his current popularity standing making him the most unpopular French President ever, if such perceptions are reinforced, it won’t help him. It’s small consolation to him that it can’t harm him all that much now, either.

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