The Patrimony

In politics, everything is relatives

Tag: nephews

The Wine, Whisky and Song Society

by fpman

Pakistan is one of those countries where there is a limited set of dominant political families as such — a subject which we will surely return to one day.

For now, let this brief look at Sidi Mohammad Muzzafar Mustafa Khan suffice. Mr. Khan is a relatively non-political member of a pretty significant political family (the Bhutto family). He is a nephew of the late Zulfikar Ali Bhutto and a cousin of the late Benazir Bhutto, both former Prime Ministers of Pakistan, both eventually killed in Pakistan’s internal political struggles — one hanged by the Army, the other assassinated.

Mr. Khan is already contemplating a legacy-building great undertaking to leave his mark on this world in a different way. A significant member of the United Kingdom’s Pakistani diaspora, he is also the owner of nightclubs and hotels in the UK (and had a son grow up beside Benazir for the latter thought his managerial duties and the nature thereof would not permit him to be the best father). He has lived a playboy life or did a very good job of creating the semblance of that and is now interested in passing on the torch to 252 single men carefully selected through a methodical vetting process; young males whom he hopes to socialize into gentlemanhood. This would be his Wine, Whisky and Song Society. Mr. Khan is taking steps to provide for adequate female company, too, of course. And his plan is to throw some great parties in the near future on his luxury yacht and in other convenient venues.

His summary of his personal reasons for all his noble efforts just begs to be quoted here:

“The main reason I’m doing this is I’ll have 250 pallbearers at my funeral and they’ll say ‘this man taught us how to live’. My dear cousin Benazir had a million people at hers so I’ll still be some way behind.”

The Cocaine International

by fpman

Interesting news from Albania.

Former Albanian Communist leader Enver Hoxha’s nephew, Ermal Hoxha, was arrested yesterday during a police raid on a cocaine laboratory in the village of Xibrake, south of the Albanian capital Tirana. Over a 100 kg of cocaine and four tons of additive materials were seized, and two Colombian citizens were also netted in the operation, preceded by a joint investigation of German and Albanian police.

The cocaine originates “from Cuba,” it is reported, although given the presence of Colombians one would think otherwise. Cuba may certainly have served as a transit point along the substance’s route to Europe, on its way towards Germany, though.

Drug cartels began making airdrops of cocaine along Cuba’s shores, for pickup by speedboats headed to Florida, a very long time ago. These drops have also proved sufficient to serve a good part of what domestic market there is for the substance in Cuba. It is small wonder if eventually some Cuban officials got involved and if participation in long-distance trade is a result in what is thus a more permissive environment for related transactions (with officials closing their eyes or actively joining).

If there truly is a link to Cuba in this particular case, a Hoxha’s involvement may possibly be further sign of this trend.

Even though both were Communist countries, Albania and Cuba did not have an entirely convenient link between each other during Communist times. Cuba was backed by the Soviets whom Albanians turned away from (in the post-Stalin period, for a mix of ideological and geopolitical reasons). Cuba and Albania did maintain ties, however, and people from one side may have known people from the other in the past in their case. Which means there may be some ideologically grounded fraternity (or at least the memory thereof) between them. And it also means that some of the people that these people knew in their own respective countries may now know each other, too — and may conspire, although this is purely speculation of course.

Hoxha_StalinRemember Stalin? The late Enver Hoxha at his desk, Stalin’s portrait hanging above his head

The born-Bush legacy

by fpman

Some in-your-face analysis on the new Texas land commissioner, George Prescott Bush, elected yesterday: He’s got a name. And a family.

“People like the idea of a next generation of Bushes in Texas politics. He’s seen very positively across the board, by Republicans and Democrats. People know the name, it has very positive resonance in Texas, even more positive than George H.W. Bush or George W. Bush. He’s young, he’s good-looking, but there’s nothing substantive yet about him.” (Cal Jillson, political scientist, Southern Methodist University, Texas, US)

In case you wondered what the Bush family connections look like, here is the family history, along with the family bush tree.

george_hw_bush_family_history

George P. is thus grandson of former President George H.W., nephew to former President George W., and the son of former Florida governor “Jeb”, a.k.a. John Ellis (a potential presidential aspirant in 2016).

As George P. recently declared: “It’s legacy that I embrace and that I’m not going to run away from.”

In Texas that may be the right attitude. In the rest of the United States the same thing may not work equally well overall.

Mistakes get made

by fpman

“There will be a review into the way we verify photos downloaded from Facebook.”

That is what editor-in-chief of The Age, an Australian paper, promised when it became clear that along with the Sydney Morning Herald they both printed Thursday’s front pages with the photo of an innocent man whom they presented as the perpetrator behind the 2014 Endeavour Hills incident.

Sending a lynch mob to anybody’s address is pretty bad,” of course, regardless of whether it is the “right” or the “wrong” address. It is still the more frustrating that two papers with considerable readership mistook an innocent man for a violent person who attempted to kill two policemen with a knife. Even worse, the media, somehow unable to think reasonably, keeps referreing to said violent person, the one who actually stabbed two policemen and was shot eventually, as a “terror suspect.” How they cannot tell the difference between a suspect and a dead assailant who, once shot dead, was found to be in possession of an Islamic State flag, is as puzzling as the question of how they end up printing the wrong photo from Facebook to have something to put on their front pages.

But things get worse than this.

The innocent man happens to be a certain Abu Bakar Alam, no other than the 19-year old grandson of Hakim Taniwal, the former governor of first Khost and then Paktia province in Afghanistan (he was a government minister, as Minister of Mines, in between his two stints as governor). Hakim Taniwal was a brave Afghan-Australian who returned to his country after 2001 to take a position of responsibility there and was killed along with a nephew in 2006 by a teenage suicide bomber. Even his funeral was bombed by Islamist insurgents. You can read about him here, here and here.

Abu Bakar Alam is thus exactly the kind of guy from the kind of family whom you are not interested in alienating when a considerable part of the other person’s – the dead assailant’s – community reacts to the shooting of a person who stabbed two police officers in this way.