The Patrimony

In politics, everything is relatives

Tag: Russia

A bunch of girls in Russia

by fpman

Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin, president of Russia and formerly a counter-intelligence officer, prefers to keep his daughters’ identity a secret.

So now, even with the suspicions there are, we cannot be entirely sure if one of his daughters is an acrobat-dancer-slash-scientist. A pity.

Another interesting consequence of this policy of secrecy, in the country that was once, for a brief while, ruled by a false Dimitriy, is a bunch of false Putinas:

“So far, a bunch of girls have come forth as Vladimir Putin’s daughters,” says Dmitry Peskov, a spokesman for President Putin.

It is certainly a conceivable stratagem in an environment similar to Russia’s. For it to succeed in the (somewhat) longer run, accomplices are a must. Speaking strictly in the abstract, false VIPs of this kind may come in four different varieties: decoys, entrepreneurs, crazies, and momentary opportunists. It is only in crazies’ case that the person concerned would not be part of a group involved in the impostorship. Accomplices are needed to get street cred: to spread rumours around as to who you “really” are, to give confidential references etc. In the case of the entrepreneur it would be a group seeking economic opportunities in this way, mostly. In the case of a decoy, it could be a state-run operation, with the aim to divert attention away from “those we don’t speak of” (I hope you like obscure movie references). Even some of the seemingly crazies may be sent out there to leave a legacy of uncertainty as to who the real VIPs happen to be.

A momentary opportunist is a person who uses reference to oneself as someone special’s special someone to get out of a specific situation, only as a tactic. If you’re looking for an example of this, well, here is an imperfect one, given that it is more that of a wannabe momentary opportunist whose aspirations stemmed largely from the consumption of alcohol on the occasion: a man claiming to be Vladimir Putin’s cousin after he was caught drunk-driving by Surrey police in the UK.

This is (not?) Russia today

by fpman

Alexei Navalny is a strong and stubborn critic of Russian President Vladimir Putin. He has also been working to expose corruption in state-owned enterprises such as Transneft. To no significant effect. Not much happened in follow-up to his revealing of documents concerning possible corruption related to Transneft except he eventually came under accusations of embezzling money from two companies himself. He was accused of having done so together with his brother, Oleg Navalny, who was sentenced by a Russian court related to this on December 30, just a couple of days ago (Alexei was handed a suspended sentence). Oleg will now be sent for three and a half years to a penal labor camp. There was a protest against this in freezing conditions by some people in Moscow yesterday. Never the most frightening thing from any regime’s prespective, given the unfriendly weather. Yet Russian police intervened to arrest about a hundred of the protesters.

Not a nice story.

The amount of coverage it received under the “Russian politics” section on “RT”, i.e. formerly “Russia Today,” the international news television channel sponsored by the Russian state? You can check that yourself. Don’t try too hard. I’ll include here a selection of RT’s headlines I found there myself:

1) Attempts to isolate Russia have been thwarted – senator. The head of Russia’s Upper House Foreign Relations Committee has said that coordinated efforts of all branches of power prevented attempts to isolate the country and exercise “political and economic blackmail” over Moscow.

2) ‘US military hardware will cause more bloodshed in Ukraine’ – Russian official. The possible relocation of US hardware from Afghanistan to Ukraine suggested by President Obama will only lead to more casualties, a senior Russian lawmaker has stated.

3) State Duma chief suggests trying US for WWII nuke attacks. The Russian Lower House speaker wants to instigate an international investigation into the 1945 nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by the US military – a possible crime against humanity with no statute of limitation.

4) ‘Stop blaming everything on Russia’: Heirs to 1917 revolutionary-era emigrants appeal to EU. Over 100 descendants of the Russian nobility residing outside the country have addressed European nations with a call to stop irrationally alienating Russia and give an unbiased appraisal to the current Ukrainian crisis.

5) France shows its weakness by scrapping Mistral deal – Rogozin. France’s refusal to deliver the Mistral amphibious ships to Russia, can’t be considered force-majeure, but confirms its geopolitical weakness, says he Russian Deputy PM in charge of the defense industry.

The above are 5 out of 12 of the regular news stories RT was running today in its Russian Politics section. Representatives of the Russian state are the chief source for four of those stories (with the exception of the pro-Russia lobby group) and for all seven of the rest. For 11 out of 12 in total. The chief messages transmitted from those chief (state) sources behind the 4 selected reports highlighted are: “don’t give weapons to Ukraine” (message to the US), “give weapons to Russia” (message to France), “the US killed people” (in Hiroshima and Nagasaki), “stop blaming/start liking Russia” (message to everyone). These are not really reports about domestic Russian politics – this is Russian foreign policy rather, including public diplomacy.

Besides this, RT also has a sub-section under “Russian politics” called “Official word.” Apparently this focuses even more on what Russian state leaders say, with headlines such as “Putin: ‘Supporting Russophobia in Ukraine will result in catastrophe’”; “Russia overestimated EU’s independence from US – Lavrov to French media”; and “‘Landmark in Russian history’: President Vladimir Putin’s New Year address.”

No news story on the Navalny case. No mention of it even as, say, a triumph of the Russian state over corruption.

From the site that uses the following two words as its main slogan: “QUESTION MORE.”

RTcover(They decided to question less on this occasion.)

Auctioning off some Russian foreign affairs correspondence

by fpman

This letter, from 1762, is going to be auctioned on November 19 in Paris. In it, the Russian Empress Catherine II (actually a lady of German origin) is writing to her lover, Stanisław August Poniatowski, who would be King of Poland as Stanisław II only two years later. Catherine has just inherited the Russian throne and is in a precarious situation. She is sending some vital instructions to Stanisław to avoid unnecessary trouble. As quoted here (at the end of the article in question):

“You read my letters with very little attention. I’ve told you and repeated that I risk being assaulted from all sides if you put one foot back in Russia.”

Life was to become only more complicated later on…

CatherineIIWords of discontent in the letter…

For about 10 to 12 thousand Euros you may have the rest of the letter as well. And here you find the rest of the private letters written by famous women that will be auctioned on the same day, if you have some more money to spend…

But I wish to stop by the story of Catherine and Stanisław because theirs is a particularly interesting historical case with a view to the role of personal relationships in politics.

It was Catherine’s hope, and of those around her in St. Petersburg, that they would be in control of Stanisław just like they were in control of many other key figures in the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth who were their paid clients at the time, including the Hetmans or the Commanders of the Polish and Lithuanian Armies. Palace intrigue played a role in why Catherine and Stanisław came together back in 1755, but they felt genuine attraction towards one another and would eventually consider marrying each other, before the idea became inconvenient (once Catherine had become ruler of Russia). And Anna Petrovna, Catherine’s second child, was possibly their daughter. In 1764, when Stanisław would be elected as King of the Polish noble republic, Russia spent a lot of money on getting him there and even positioned their troops near the site of the election assembly to make sure they got the result they wanted.

In the end, however,

“Stanisław-August, despite his links with the Empress Catherine, was the leader of Reform in Poland: the Empress, despite her links with the Enlightenment, was the paymistress of Poland’s conservative establishment.” (Davies, 2001: 270)

In other words: Stanisław II was independent-minded and attempted to carry out major reform of the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth, including some very progressive and liberal policies, at the same time as he sought to strengthen the autonomy of his state. He was, after all, one out of only four Polish kings out of the eleven elected Kings of the Polish noble republic (the others were foreigners). Yet he was to be the last one.

It was his quest for highly timely reform that resulted in the end in the Partition of Poland. Russia considered the reforms a threat to its control over what it saw as a client state and a useful buffer zone against threats from the West: Prussia and Austria. Russia thus intervened, and once it did so it was forced by the logic of power politics to enter into talks over Poland’s future, resulting in the three-stage, three-way partition of the country at the end of which nothing was left of it, by 1795.

Reference

Norman Davies: Heart of Europe: The Past in Poland’s Present. Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2001.

Putin’s gesture

by fpman

Russian President Vladimir Putin wrapped a shawl around Peng Liyuan, Chinese President Xi Jinping’s wife at the APEC summit yesterday.

Sigh. Boring.

Yawn.

What…? This counts as big news somewhere, somehow? The Guardian explains how:

“The incident, at a performance linked to this week’s Asia-Pacific Economic Cooperation (Apec) summit, was originally shown on state TV and spread online as a forwarded video. But it was soon scrubbed clean from the internet in China, reflecting the intense control authorities exert over any material about the country’s leaders while also pointing to cultural differences over what is considered acceptable behaviour in public.

“China is traditionally conservative on public interaction between unrelated men and women, and the public show of consideration by Putin may provide fodder for jokes, which the big boss probably does not like,” said the Beijing-based historian and independent commentator Zhang Lifan.”

Very interesting. So the censors partly get the blame for this.

Not all the blame though. Some of Western media is in overdrive now to frame what happened either as a “PUTIN GAFFE” or as “CHINESE CENSORSHIP” or both.

Russia’s English-language media in return talks about… hold your breath…

…still hold your breath…

…still hold it…

…SHAWL CHIVALRY!

By the way, from RT’s article linked above you can also learn that Vladimir Putin engaged in similar shawl chivalry at the G20 meeting in St. Petersburg last year, on Angela Merkel in that case.

Alright, back to lazy times. Just chillin’.

Question of the day: where, within one’s network of human contacts, is there place for a Gazprom lobbyist?

by fpman

Contrary to what some people may think, in the title I am asking an open question, having just read this article from RFE/RL. It concerns primarily decision-makers, of course, and not the ordinary person.

The article points out that EU High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy (“EU foreign policy chief”) Federica Mogherini has a spokeswoman, Catherine Ray, who has a husband, Thomas Barros-Tastets, who in turn happens to be working for a company called G+ which has Gazprom among its major clients (G+ deals with Gazprom in the value of 300,000 to 350,000 Euros per annum).

Does this help Gazprom? Is it significant related to this that Federica Mogherini, before she took office, was thought by some to be too understanding towards Russia?

One obvious question that has to be asked is if Thomas Barros-Tastets’ work was kept a secret throughout the vetting process which saw wife Catherine get the job of spokesperson. And the answer is apparently it wasn’t. Mogherini as well as others knew.

Of course, for her part, Mogherini then takes even more responsibility for this, in case there’s anything wrong with this. Which is not easy to tell.

Some in the Commission have what seems to them an easy answer. Margaritis Schinas, the chief spokesman for the European Commission says:

“(Catherine) Ray is charged with speaking on Africa, Latin America, and Gulf countries. Fellow foreign affairs spokeswoman Maja Kocijancic speaks for Mogherini on European affairs, including Russia. We therefore do not believe there is a potential conflict of interest with…Ray’s duties at the commission.”

While we cannot determine the answer to the above questions really (especially to the question of whether Catherine Ray’s position helps Gazprom), we can safely tell that Margaritis Schinas is using a flawed argument above. Gazprom, which used to be the Soviet Ministry of Gas back in the day, does not have interests only related to Russia but as a profit-making venture and as a State-Owned Enterprise (majority-owned by the Russian state) it has complex economic and political interests related to almost every continent, the Gulf countries being the most obvious example of this. So in the end this is still kinda interesting.

Connection, ally, friend, buddy

by fpman

Connection. Ally. Friend. Buddy. These are just some of the labels customarily attached by now to Arkady R. Rotenberg in the media — largely, though not exclusively, outside Russia — given that he is all or any of these to Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin.

The New York Times chose the word “friend” to describe him. And to some degree he must be that. And more than a Facebook/VKontakte friend, for sure. Arkady and Vladimir used to go to the same judo club back in the Soviet Union, and they seem to have remained strategic partners ever since. Arkady and his brother Boris both have extensive business interests, including ownership of the pipeline construction company Stroigazmontazh (SGM), interests that seem to expand lately. Now Arkady apparently controls a major share of the school textbook market, too, according to the New York Times, through a company chaired by him called “Enlightenment” (insider joke alert).

A rival competitor (in the school textbook market), obviously bitter over these recent developments, is quoted as saying, mostly about the Russian political-slash-economic elite overall:

“They used to focus on the very biggest businesses: oil, gas, big infrastructure projects, the banks. But now that they have eaten all the food in that cupboard, they are eating the mice, and the mice’s food, going after smaller and smaller markets.”

An official explanation as to why less textbooks in the market would be good for Russian people:

“Many people drink Coca-Cola, but that does not mean it is good for you.”

You do understand? Do I understand not? Does this sense make…? Well, of course in a sense it does — if you look at this with interest in controlling Russian minds or at least what those minds may consume.

Arkady seems content with the situation. After winning a few major contracts connected to the Sochi Olympic Games in the past he famously said:

“If people didn’t give me all this publicity, calling me a ‘Friend of Putin’, then my business would be worse. And so it’s growing well.”

Otherwise, all that talk of friendship is obviously nonsense. Who heard of friendship on the tatami? Illustration with non-random judo master, on the cover of a book published by the company that first bought Enlightenment through privatization…

PutinJudoBookTitle: “Let’s learn judo – with Vladimir Putin”

Gérard Depardieu is a businessman, not a politician

by AiteVer

Ello. It’s AiteVer again. Did you miss me? Did you notice I was gone? Well, I guess you were in good company anyway, thanks to fpman, my colleague over here and a cousin apparently, too 🙂

Anyhow, while I was busy upgrading my status in academia [sic!], the globe was shaken [very sic!] by the news that Gérard Depardieu can drink or drinks up to 14 bottles of wine a day. In my opinion, it is quite a shame that this is the one snippet that swept the news world as it was taken out of some truly remarkable context: from an interview that’s filled with astonishing statements such as

‘Putin is a simple guy, a former KGB agent who was long imprisoned in Vienna’

or

‘Do you think that if I was egocentric I could approach Jean-Paul II, Mitterrand, Castro, Putin, and all those kinds of people? I don’t care about having an ego. ‘

I guess these days it isn’t really news when a celebrity takes up a second job advertising other people’s stuff or starts his or her own business. It can be especially true for those who are over their prime time in showbiz. As for Depardieu, he has done all of these. Before his abandonment of his status as French cultural god and becoming a ‘tax refugee’, he was known to own a vineyard and other businesses in France, and he gave his name to basically anything, whether it was ketchup, Azeri cuisine or an Armenian air company, naturally regardless of politics. Well, regardless of politics at least as long as the politics of certain policies didn’t affect him personally…

The change came into his life with the introduction of a temporary 75% income tax in 2012 by the French government that was levied on people earning more than a million euros. He first moved to Belgium and was subsequently granted Russian citizenship by a presidential decree on January 1, 2013. What’s changed since? Little – and maybe some, I would argue.

He’s admittedly into ‘living a life of excess’ just as much today as pre-tax-scandal, and he still lives the dual life of a high-profile actor and successful businessman. Nonetheless, he now also plays in a movie whose plot is rather reminiscent of the DSK scandal, in a patriotic Kazakh film, and lately in a Russian movie set partly in Chechnya, too. Added to this, his Russian businesses include a chain of restaurants present in major Russian cities, as well as a line of organic vodka. Also, he has appeared in a Kazakh commercial advertising Eurasian Bank’s special VIP card that is ‘elaborated with a pure gold pattern and 0.02 carat genuine diamond’ and in a video with Gulnara Karimova (of whom we already wrote on this blog) – to further illustrate the diversity of his impressive portfolio. Altogether, we can assume that whatever he is doing, he must be really successful in it, considering the expenses it must take to sponsor his daily 14 bottles of quality alcohol, ‘whenever he’s bored.’

DepardieuIn vino veritas (source)

The notable part from a political point of view is that his post-career career has brought him onto a slippery slope. As a symbol of the West from a certain perspective, whatever he says resonates loudly. Even though Depardieu’s love for Russia perhaps did not start with acquiring citizenship, it definitely has given him room to voice his ideas on international politics. He started his new career as a proud Russian by calling the country a ‘great democracy’ and then went on to praise Russian President Vladimir Putin on multiple occasions. And as the dominant political narrative of events in Ukraine has increasingly focused on a conflict with the West in Russia, the role of the well-known French national symbol has grown in parallel.

Of course, there is some importance of his Russianness in the Europe he left behind, too. Firstly, his departure left a mark on France, as he was one of the most famous exports of the country. Secondly, his stance towards Putin is quite controversial, as signaled by the large amount of questions he receives from western media.

Still, his presence in Russia is possibly much more important for the host country itself, which, given his presence in the Russian press, has clearly been recognized by Russian decision-makers too. For example, according to Russian media, on a trip to Serbia he recently praised the people there for not supporting the EU sanctions against Russia, while in an interview about his new movie Viktor, he hastily explained Ukrainian history by saying the western half used to be Polish and the eastern half Russian, even though he quickly added that he isn’t too competent in politics to talk about it…

Depardieu is now, for all its worth, a (proud) Russian citizen. He pays lower taxes, he’s involved in local business and he’s a friend of Putin. On the other hand, he still is an international superstar and that continues to work in his favor financially. When he was asked why he’s still in business, he replied:

‘I have to make a living, and besides, I do other things too. Cinema is not the only thing I do, luckily. I hang out with artists, I travel, I’m into cuisine, and wine, I go and visit dictators…or so they say!’

If I have to take a guess he probably meant to be kidding with the last part but he definitely hit the spot. Of course we will never know if he says his pro-Kremlin remarks out of political conviction (to which he is entitled) or because of his current business interests (to which he is also entitled) but there is one thing for certain. Whatever he says can reach the masses easily. And the issue isn’t really whatever we think about his competence to talk politics but that when he and others praise Putin for his actions in Ukraine, they make loud judgments over issues by which they are not the least affected… Or, more exactly, if they are affected it is not in the way the people in Ukraine are affected. Depardieu is a Russian citizen, and being there has commercially benefitted him greatly. As long as he remains the friend of the Boss, this isn’t expected to change significantly.

The Cousinhood of Humanity

by fpman

So apparently it is very popular these days to be looking for one’s distant cousins, and a pioneer of this is popular author A. J. Jacobs.

In this case, by “cousin” one does not mean people whom one would really think of as relatives in the sense of being closely related.

In its more distant sense, A.J. Jacobs is “cousins” with Gwyneth Paltrow, Michael Bloomberg and others, among 75 million cousins of his that he managed to identify so far. In fact, they may be “n-degree cousins x times removed” – where n may be a fairly large number and x may be zero or larger, to be scientifically accurate.

This is possible given how there really were not that many ancestors in previous generations to provide every living person today with their very own neat blood lineage. Instead, we all carry mitochondrial DNA and Y chromosomes from a rather narrow group and thus share in our DNA heritage. Our most recent common ancestors (who are descendents of earlier common ancestors of course) can thus be found through both matrilineal and patrilinial descent. “Mitochondrial Eve” and “Y-chromosomal Adam,” respectively. Given the science of this, Eve might have lived a mere 2,000 years ago (if we assume enough blending of teh peoplez since the beginning of comprehensive globalization) whereas Adam roamed the wilderness about 60,000 to 90,000 years ago.

From the point of view of politics, it may seem interesting to reflect on how Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko and Russian President Vladimir Putin, Dutch far right politician Geert Wilders and Islamic State caliph Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi or, say, Edward Snowden and Julian Assange may be distantly related. Not only with each other but with each and every one of those listed.

Having said that, one remembers how British King George V, German Kaiser Wilhelm II and Russian Tsar Nicholas II were actually cousins and yet it still didn’t work out all that well between them.

They were related through George V who was first cousins with both (as cross cousins, i.e. as the offspring of opposite-sex children of shared grandparents).

Wilhelm and Nicholas were thus not first cousins (sharing grandparents) but were only third cousins in fact, sharing great-great-grandparents in the Romanov family (though at the same time Nicholas was also second cousin once removed from Wilhelm’s point of view, through their shared ancestors in the Hohenzollern family).

The image below, via the Brookings Institute, is worth having a look to develop an understanding of these nuances.

Cousins_WWI_Wilhelm_Nicholas_George

Given such a prominent instance of intra-family feduing as World War One it is hard to argue with A. J. Jacobs’ pessimistic assessment when he says:

“I don’t think KKK members will be singing Kumbaya with African Americans.”

And unlike Jacobs, we do not even expect, as a result of his considerable efforts at finding cousins, a significant decrease in what he refers to as the “elitism” of those proud of their descent. People who were simple-minded enough to think that being born into a family or where and when they were born constituted a merit of theirs can’t, shan’t, and won’t change their minds about this.

The Cousinhood of Humanity will likely remain a utopian idea – beyond being scientific fact of course.

Propaganda, from dawn till Tusk

by fpman

In the context of some serious political campaign struggles in Poland in 2005 it came to be revealed, upon much dirtier allegations, that Donald Tusk, who was then leader of the Polish opposition, did have a bit of a skeleton in the closet problem. His grandfather briefly served in the ranks of the German Wehrmacht during WWII. Even this much could have hurt Tusk, given how Germany treated Poland during the world war. But a deeper look into the matter uncovered that his grandfather was forcibly recruited by the Germans in mid-1944 after serving as a (forced) railway laborer first. Mitigating circumstances, surely.

Tusk says he only learned of all this after he came under attack related to this from political forces to the right of him on the political spectrum in Poland (the camp behind the Kaczyński brothers’ Law and Justice party). This is how he spoke of this:

“I have nothing to regret, it’s my family’s biography. As a historian and as a man, I prefer to know the painful truth over a pleasant lie.”

Tusk went on to become Polish Prime Minister (2007-2014) and eventually President of the European Council – he will only take office in December, but his selection was announced at an August 30 European Council meeting.

On various, by all appearances Russia-friendly, English-language sites (see here [niver85.tumblr.com, September 2] and here [tigr.net, September 5]) that effectively function in this context as echo chambers for a propaganda machinery, there very quickly appeared a different version of Tusk’s past, however, accompanied by what was claimed to be photo proof of that version being the truth (with no references as to where the information regarding this was coming from).

According to the “creative” version, Tusk’s grandfather was even happy to serve in, well, not simply the Wehrmacht but the SS rather… To back up the allegation, even a photo was provided showing a young man in the driver’s seat of a car full of SS officers – and the young man appears remarkably similar to Donald Tusk. The similarity cannot be denied, that is for sure.

One Russian-language source spreading the SS narrative is this livejournal user who is referencing a 2005 report by Novye Izvestia that, as part of legitimate reporting of political developments in Poland, cited allegations of grandpa Józef’s SS past that came from Polish sources at the time and which were eventually discredited – though the livejournal post in question is from September 6 and thus cannot have constituted the basis for the above quoted English-language pieces on the subject. Seemingly independently from this, one chain of sources that can be followed backwards is this string of pages, from here [Zarya Novorossii/Dawn of Novorossiya, September 5] to here [Ridus.ru, September 3]. The text in this case is the one that appeared at tigr.net in English, cited above. And finally, independently of these, there is a post here, from 2011 [oper.ru] that already uses the photo purportedly showing Józef Tusk.

As it often happens, even some fringe media in Central-Eastern Europe who are otherwise interested mostly in the chance of breaking through to masses of random readers with a sudden scoop off somewhere, anywhere, transmitted the story. So did the proudly “politically incorrect” Czech news portal Stalo se, at the URL http://www.stalo-se.cz/?=21028 (no longer taking you to their original article), on September 4.

Here are the manipulative pairs of photos disseminated through the above mentioned echo chambers.

The one from Stalo Se:

ManipulativePairingOfPhotos_TuskAndAnSDmember

The one from this Tumblr page:

ManipulativePairingOfPhotos_TuskAndAnSDmember2

And where this gets really interesting is if you, seeing the SD insignia on the uniform of the officer sitting in the back, go to Wikipedia’s page on the World War Two German Sichereitsdienst (SD). There it is that you find the original of the WWII photo used against Donald Tusk and his grandfather. Here’s a screenshot of the Wikipedia image as it appears there once you click on it:

Tusk_WikiSDimage

The caption says: “Bundesarchiv Bild 101I-380-0069-37, Polen, Verhaftung von Juden, SD-Männer.” It is also added that “This image was provided to Wikimedia Commons by the German Federal Archive (Deutsches Bundesarchiv)” and “Created: September 1939.” Nowhere does it mention who these people are.

So how does one stumble upon a photo like that, showing a man, apparently from 1939, who would accidentally – and rather perfectly from the point of view of propaganda needs – resemble Donald Tusk himself so much? This is a great mystery from the magical world of Eastern Europe where devoted propagandists operating in the shadows often invest a significant number of working hours in such projects.

The one source to which I was able to eventually trace back the association-by-allegation of the above photo, showing unnamed individuals, and Donald Tusk’s grandfather is… a bunch of unknown individuals in the town of Wrocław who handed out flyers to people there some time in May 2010. Their flyer had the above photo on it, and the question of whether the person in the driver’s seat is Józef Tusk. The same flyer was also spreading conspiracy theories related to the Smolensk crash of April 2010, targeting Poland’s current president (since August 2010), Bronisław Komorowski. Komorowski is from Tusk’s party – Platforma Obywatelska or Civic Platform – and any propaganda targeting him as well as Tusk at the same time must have been spread by the political rivals of Civic Platform. Which most likely implies circles close to the Law and Justice Party that lost its leader, President Lech Kaczyński, a month earlier – in the Smolensk crash.

Ironic, isn’t it? Some Russian sources are now spreading a lie that was once spread by some of the most anti-Russian political forces in Poland.

The Patrimony’s statement on Alina Kabayeva’s recent appointment

by fpman

Alright, alright, so we’re a little late on this one, but let us get this straight…

nuttyprof2“So we’re a little late, right, but… here it’s coming!”

Alina Kabayeva, Russian President Vladimir Putin’s alleged girlfriend has just been appointed chair of the board of directors of the National Media Group (NMG) in Russia.

Putin and KabayevaPresident Putin, allegedly smiling at his alleged girlfriend (photo by Sergei Chirikov, AFP/Getty)

This is relevant, given that there is a great variety of Russian media these days, including government-owned media, Gazprom-owned media, and NMG-owned media along with what independent media there is.

NMG is, for example, one of the owners of Piervy Kanal (Первый канал), with a 25% share, alongside the government. As the name may imply, Piervy is television channel no. 1 in Russia, including in terms of the number of viewers.

That here at the Patrimony we are only reporting this now, two days late, is not due to the Russian NMG having a share in the ownership of this blog. They don’t have a share.

End of statement.